Gollum’s ring

Published June 10, 2013 by Tony

A Cursed Ring

Vyne_Ring

Most probably it was an old ring to inspire the trilogy of Lord of the Rings.
In 1929, the archaeologist Sir Mortimer Wheeler consulted the philologist John R. Tolkien to know more about the etymology of a word engraved in a gold faith from the Roman era, found in the 19th century far away from Lydney, and dating probably from the 4th century. The ring originally the property of a British Roman called Silvianus, it was apparently stolen by a person named Senicianus, upon whom Silvianus called down a curse.
A lead plaque of a type known as a “curse tablet” was discovered at the site of a Roman temple dedicated to the god Nodens (Celtic deity) at Lydney.
The plaque was inscribed with a curse:
 
“DEVO NODENTI SILVIANVS ANILVM PERDEDIT DEMEDIAM PARTEM DONAVIT NODENTI INTER QVIBVS NOMEN SENICIANI NOLLIS PETMITTAS SANITATEM DONEC PERFERA VSQVE TEMPLVM DENTIS”
[For the god Nodens. Silvianus has lost a ring and has donated one-half [its worth] to Nodens. Among those named Senicianus permit no good-health until it is returned to the temple of Nodens).

It is known that for his Trilogy Tolkien was inspired by the tetralogy “Der Ring des Nibelungen” by Richard Wagner, but it is indicative that in 1937, just seven years after that the writer had seen the ring of Senicianus, “The Hobbit” came to light.
The ring Senicianus is present at an exhibition at The Vyne, the seventeenth-century residence of Lor Sandys, Lord Chamberlain of Henry VIII, who assumes a bond between the ring and Tolkien’s work.

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