advertising

All posts tagged advertising

VINTAGE ADVERTISING

Published December 11, 2013 by Tony

ADs THAT COULD BE BANNED TODAY

Previous generations and I were accustomed to certain advertising campaigns that obviously are appropriate for the culture and society of that period. But, if today we go to review some vintage advertisings or if this happen to younger people, some of them will leave us amazed.

The first ads that come to my mind now, and that nowadays appear manifestly against the tide, are those relating to smoking or inciting tobacco addiction. After anti-smoking campaigns and the appropriate prohibitions, although cigarettes advertising is banned in many countries, such an ad would only cause resentment and harsh criticism. Yet, if new generations watch these old advertising, will realize that less than 30 years ago, smoking was a status symbol, and often the States’ monopolies advertised cigarettes, earning millions by their selling, like it happened in Italy.
Who does not remember Humphrey Bogart in Casablanca?
As in many other vintage Hollywood movies, the cigarette became an indispensable “accessory”, a symbol sometimes even sexual that filled and reinforced the interpretation or the scene.

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Although I am not an anti-feminist but for equal rights, an advertisement in which a woman appears as mother or housewife, should not shock so much. But, in fact, any advertising where woman is considered as object or that relegate her to the purely mother and housewife’s role, becomes anachronistic and provocative. Yet, sexist advertising campaigns have been several in the past. As you will see, some of them even instigate violence.

Do not be surprised if these old commercials are clearly racist, although for we Italians they were pretty inconceivable.

Ads with a clear sexual innuendo.

In other cases, children and adolescents have been used to advertise products for adults, and several advertising and marketing campaigns could be blamed for children’s sexualisation.

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MASS CONSUMPTION

Published April 6, 2013 by Tony

POOR’S CONSUMERISM

Walking down the street an old woman sees a piece of twine on the ground, bends down, picks it up and puts it in his pocket to preserve it.
Scene of other times, times when even a rope could be useful, how to tie an old cardboard suitcase for example.
Today, anyone who needs a piece of rope buy a whole roll, then forgetting it somewhere, as cardboard suitcases do not exist anymore. Today you buy a trolley or the newest Samsonite seen on TV, even if it is for only one trip.

Adaptation? Consumerism? Progress?

Perhaps the European single currency (euro) has made things worse here, then the international crisis, but if we go further back in time, economic difficulty begins with the advertising and worse with the loss of values, in a broad sense, which over the years hit our society.
For values I also mean anything concerning the little things, like that piece of twine collected from the lady. Meantime, commercials push people to wish what they do not have, to replace, to keep up with the times.
Although because of this my relatives criticize me, I do not throw away things easily, and I like to preserve and collect useful things if I find them abandoned, even if it is just a nail or an used flowerpot.
My grandma said: “astipa che truove” (as to say preserve and you will have  at disposal), and we were a family that could not be considered poor or needy. It was our lifestyle to be different, and mainly the value you gave to things…. the shame, if there was, was not for dressing a worn cloth or for not owning a car.
Trouble shared is a trouble halved, some would say. Maybe!

Some time ago, on a sidewalk, next to the trash cans, I saw a large mirror thrown, abandoned because there was no longer useful, probably. It was a beautiful mirror-style eight-shaped and I not deny the instinctive urge to pick it up and take it away before some street urchin on duty had broken it, or that garbage collectors could take it away, but the shame prevailed together inability to carry such a burden alone.
I only can guess what that old woman or any other person lived forty years ago would say…. period when any item was not thrown with such ease, and there was a sort of family and domestic recycling. I guess if one of these people of old times had the opportunity to come back to life today, he even could live off with the use of everything (still good and usable) is thrown away and that we see down the street or in the rubbish bins.
And to think that nowadays someone is addressing a holding company in order to have a dishwasher or a plasma screen, at any cost.

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OLD TV ADVERTISING FORMAT

Published February 21, 2013 by Tony

CAROSELLO

A Way to do Publicity in TV

In 1957, the RAI (initial of Italian Radiotelevision), decided to start broadcasting advertisements, and for this innovation it needed an appropriate format, because a law then in force did not allow advertising in any evening show, and not before a period of ninety seconds from the beginning of the same.
And so, the television program called “CAROSELLO” (Carousel), was born, which went on the air for 20 years, from February 1957 to January 1977, on the then single national network (now called RAI 1), for a total of 7261 episodes.
“Carosello” was daily broadcasted, from 20:50 to 21:00, and was discontinued only in rare occasions, such as the Pope’s death, the killing of Kennedy or during the landing of the spacecraft Apollo 14 on the Moon.
The rigid format was not only a “spot” container, but consisted of a series of films (shorts), sketch theater comedy-style with musical interludes, or cartoons, then followed by the advertisements. Everything was predetermined, like the number of seconds devoted to advertising, the number of citations of the advertised product, as well as the number of seconds to devote to the show, whose plot often was unrelated to the product itself.
The main rule of Carosello was that each show (lasting 1 minute and 45 seconds), had to be strictly separated and distinguished from the mere publicity, while the “product” (réclame) had to be mentioned only at the end of the sketch, which often lavished a promise towards the quality of the product itself. Almost all the known “brands” of the time were advertised through this program.
In the creation of most Carosello shows have participated famous directors such as Luciano Emmer, Age and Scarpelli, Luigi Magni, Gillo Pontecorvo, Ermanno Olmi, Sergio Leone, Hugh Gregory, Pupi Avati, Pier Paolo Pasolini, Federico Fellini, Richard Lester, and famous actors like Toto, Erminio Macario, Gilberto Govi, Vittorio Gassman, Dario Fo, Mina, Ernesto Calindri, Nino Manfredi, Virna Lisi, Gino Bramieri, Raimondo Vianello, Gino Cervi, Fernandel, Eduardo De Filippo, Jerry Lewis, Jayne Mansfield, Orson Welles, Yul Brynner.
The beginning of “Carosello” was an animation depicting the opening of a curtain marked by a piece of music that resembled a kind of fanfare.
In addition to introducing the innovation of réclame, this solution was the way to do it by inserting advertisements in a context that had the advantage of making them pleasant, and for this Carosello was a huge success, remaining for many years one of the most viewed program, very loved by adults and children. Over the years it became a typical “Italian family” evening appointment, to the point that even the common saying (addressed the children), “in bed after Carousel” was born on that time.
Today, Carosello is part of Italian TV history, and although the new generations do not know it, its memory still is alive in our minds, and maybe it has been this nostalgia along with the need to heal the RAI finances, which some leaders have thought to reintroduce this format. It is said that as early as next March, Carosello again will be broadcasted on the national network, in a revised and adapted version.

Here, some old sketch, shorts or cartoons transmitted during Carosello.

http://youtu.be/EunT4-7ftxo

http://youtu.be/BlM–m-AELY

http://youtu.be/-JKaR2_cf0Y

http://youtu.be/tMOPvcdHWF4

http://youtu.be/mJF8bgJNQvs

http://youtu.be/Xc46PzAZOKs

http://youtu.be/NASlgSp1sI0

http://youtu.be/WxPF75bFz14

http://youtu.be/5IkaITYWpo4

http://youtu.be/mT3qJSWE6YM

http://youtu.be/f-ARPRbUwLM

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ACXIOM AND PERSONAL DATA

Published February 8, 2013 by Tony

BIG BROTHER IS THERE

Big Brother really exists and is located in Conway, Arkansas.
Here, day and night more than 23 000 computers grind information of millions of people drawn by any source in the web. These servers are not operated by CIA or Google, but from a little-known and discreet company called Acxiom, that knows everything about millions consumers and Internet users in America and in the world.
Acxiom (Acxiom Corporation) is a marketing technology and services company with offices in the United States, Europe, Asia and South America. It offers various marketing and information management services, including multichannel marketing, addressable advertising and database management. Acxiom collects, analyses, and parses customer and business information for clients, helping them to target advertising campaigns, score leads, and more.
Likely, on Acxiom’s servers are stored age, race, sex, weight, height, education, sexual preferences, political opinions, buying habits, dreams, health, and who knows what else, of nearly all Americans and of many Europeans.
The New York Times says that, according to experts, Acxiom has collected over the years, the largest body of data ever on consumers.  His computers process more than 50 billion data per year and it is said that in 2011 about 500 million people had been “indexed” on these servers, for each of which had been found 1500 information. These information are then reviewed, classified and catalogued by the software, to make them available for a fee to companies that request it. Obviously, Acxiom’s customers include banks, manufacturers, e-commerce companies and department stores who want to know more about people’s tastes. A very profitable business, given that in 2011 the Acxiom had a turnover of 1.1 billion U.S. dollars with a profit of 77 million. According to the company’s leaders, everything is perfectly legal since they provide only to collect information available in public records, on the internet or on social networks. In the United States there is a growing fear for “database marketing”, especially if conducted on a large scale that can have unforeseen and disturbing developments. It is expected, in fact, that this company does not want only to collect and sell such data, but has also developed a software, that based on the data collected, will influence consumers actions. (See the picture)
Not to mention the ethical implications when a commercial company starts to “handle” sensitive information such as health status, political or sexual preferences.  I guess that as minimum the consumer should know, with certainty, what use is made of his/her data and which companies are buying them.

1a Image32For curiosity, Smith does a search and visit a site that sells printers. images
1b images

Later, Smith login in his Facebook account and finds advertising about printers.

When subsequently Smith visits an e-commerce site….. ecommerce-bo

…will find a special offer for a printer for him!

source: Panorama June, 27, 2012