artist

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NERO SYNDROME

Published February 16, 2014 by Tony

– POWER SEEKING –

The term “syndrome of Nero ” refers to that phenomenon for which people who hoped to go down in history as artists, and fail, whether there is an opportunity, they then fall back on the management of the power, leaving their artistic dreams unrealized.
As to say that at high levels the frustration produces monsters, because such individuals, in their youth, have not found the craved cheering audience, although convinced that they deserved it.
There is someone, like the Italian writer Enrico Buonanno, who with his book entitled precisely “the syndrome of Nero “, makes analogies that lead to the following conclusion: every tyrant is concealed behind a failed artist!

The journey begins by Nero who hoped to be remembered as a good dramatist, poet and actor, and who, instead, deficient in all three fields, has gone down in history as one of the worst emperors, most totalitarian and self-satisfied as ever.
About Napoleon, we remember the many victories, but many forget that as a young man he wrote horrible novels and dialogues.
Mussolini failed through poetry, fiction and tragedies.
Hitler painted very ugly paintings and had been repeatedly rejected at the Imperial Academy in the early ‘900.
Goebbels, the Reich’s minister of culture, before burning all the books, during his youth had tried in vain to get published, scribbling meaningless comedies.
Marx, before the Revolution tried to imitate Shakespeare and Goethe, publishing miserable collections of poetry, wishing to become a novelist.
And what about the non-pianist Lenin, or Stalin’s chants who loved poetry and drama.
But the similarities continue into more modern times, just remember the manuals wrote by Kim Jong who dreamed to be a director, or the war criminal Karadzic, another failed poet. Saddam published short bedouin stories, as Gaddafi published a book of short stories titled “Escape to Hell.”
Perhaps, these events may not reflect the whole truth behind such sick minds, but these affinities surprise and should warn us against lousy person or losers who, getting no applause, go to look elsewhere their mania of grandeur.

MUSIC LIFE

Published December 19, 2013 by Tony

– ENZO AVITABILE –

- ENZO AVITABILE -


Celebrated to the last Art Show in Venice, “Music Life” is a documentary dedicated to Enzo Avitabile and directed by acclaimed director Jonathan Demme.
The video’s exciting images that highlight the high musical level of the musician, mixed with scenes of daily life, have been projected last week in almost all Italian movies. Through the poetic music of the Neapolitan artist, the director has created a story that follows his desire to save the world, giving to the documentary a clear political significance. In perfect communion with the sensitivity of Demme, the Avitabile’s songs, always open to contamination and differences, exhibit solidarity for the oppressed and an empathy for the margins. A video to watch.


For the uninitiated, Enzo Avitabile is a famous saxophonist, musician and songwriter from Naples, perhaps best known in Italy for the song “Soul Express”, but who has had a background in all respect. He grows in the neighborhood of Naples called Marianella, studying the saxophone, and starting to perform at 7-8 years in Americans locals of Naples, and later graduating in flute at the Conservatory of San Pietro a Majella. In 1979 his participation in the second Pino Daniele’s self-titled album, and in 1980 he gave his contribution to another important Pino Daniele’s album called “Nero a metà”. In 1982 he released his first album, “Avitabile” , which already showed his black music style, and in which one song was dedicated to the deceased friend Mario Musella (“The Showmen”‘s singer). In 1983 he released his second album, with the song “Gospel mio” sung by Richie Havens. 1986 is the year of release of one of his best-known works, “SOS Brothers”, which contains the historic “Soul Express” and “Black Out”, whose remix version won a prize in Ibiza for the best dance song of the year. In 1988 he published “Alto Voltaggio”, in which he reiterate the presence of his love for funk, with a collaboration with Afrika Bambaataa, that will bring to the creation of the album “Street Happiness”. In devising his music the singer-songwriter has never been affected by commercial logic. In 1994 he released “Easy” where he puts in music the poem ” ‘A livella” by Toto, and where in “Leave me or love me” he sang with Randy Crawford. On that time, the record company EMI saddled him with the label of “artist unmanageable”, because he refused to participate in the Festival of Sanremo. In the same year he participated to the Pistoia Blues Festival. Since 2004, his records’ covers have been signed by the anthropologist Marino Niola. In 2009 he won the Italian Targa Tenco for the best record in Neapolitan dialect, with the album “Napoletana” released the same year.

First public exhibition

Last year, in the television show “Sottovoce ” by Gigi Marzullo , Enzo said:

<< As a boy, my dreams were simple: learn to play the saxophone and meet the artists who I listened thanks to the jukebox . >>
<< The word is already music, and I like to get there with the music where the words do not come, and vice versa. There is a mantra in our Neapolitan dialect. I hope to make music but to also say something, conveying my thoughts through the music.>>
<< Naples and Marianella are the ‘Mother home’ to me, when I am back in Naples there are certain conditions, fundamental states of consciousness, which in my opinion are to be linked to certain things, because for me the (cultural) contamination is very important, but I think it is fundamental the recovery of our cultural identity. >>
<<Mine can be defined as ‘World Music’, but I wanted to borrow from the greats artists of the past the ability to move inside any form, to go over the same shape, to create new forms, which do not really have a form… this seems to be a pun, but it is a return to pure music, one that goes beyond labels.>>
<< I can define myself a loner among people, like all of us. ‘Chi nun cunosce ‘o scuro nu po’ capì a luce, nisciuno s’ape ‘a nato, ognuno è sulo’. If loneliness is introspection and constant contact with our interior, it becomes something that you live even in the tumult of everyday life, but if it becomes marginalization, it becomes a different thing. No longer a choice but a condition. >>
<< I am a street intellectual and I like if the street generates intellectuals. I am a man of everyday, but a thinking being. >>
<< The music joins and saved the world. So many times, like John Lennon, Jim Hendrix, James Brown, Bob Marley, Giovanni Pergolesi or Stravinsky have did. >>

 together Pino Daniele

The last Avitabile’s record, released last year, is titled “Black Tarantella”, which like the previous one has won the Targa Tenco, while the song “Gerardo nuvola ‘e Povere”, won the Amnesty Award Italy. As he says, is a particular recording that gets nothing to do with the words Black or Tarantella, but wants to be a tribute to the allegorical synonymy of recent years. Tarantella is the symbol of the Made in Italy, our original sound of the south, but we Neapolitans use this term to also mean something different, as we sometimes use the term black (meaning a lack of a way out) to indicate a hope, a chance. With this record I wanted to simply explore the double meaning of words and music.

together James Brown

together Tina Turner

togehter Africa Bambaataa

(Meeting with Africa Bambaataa in the Bronx, then they came to Marianella and together they made a video for the district Scampia)

Cappella Sansevero

Published March 24, 2013 by Tony

SANSEVERO CHAPEL
Raimondo of Sangro

San Severo

Who has had the opportunity to read some articles in which I speak of Naples, about the long-standing problems facing the city, will be became aware of my love-hate feeling towards it. Different matter, however, is to consider this city under a cultural and artistic point of view. As many assert, and I am convinced, it is a city – if not the only – with the highest concentration of natural beauty and works of high historical and artistic interest, a truly huge cultural heritage. Among these is included the “Chapel of San Severo” or “Santa Maria della Pietà” in the historic center of the city.
Its creator, Raimondo di Sangro VII, Prince of Sansevero was a scholar, a soldier, an inventor, anatomist and esoteric Freemason born in Foggia in 1710 and died in Naples in 1771, around which many legends were born.   The members of his family were grandees of Spain, owners of countless feuds in Apulia (as Sansevero Torremaggiore, Castelnuovo, Casalvecchio), and, by paternal line, claimed to be directly descended from Charlemagne.
Motherless since childhood, he was assigned to the paternal grandparents who at 10 years sent him to study at the Jesuit School of Rome, where he remained until 20 years.  His father was gone to Vienna, to escape incarceration because accused of having killed a girl’s father in Sansevero, with whom he had fallen in love, and later retired to a monastery in Rome where he took his vows. Naples was the permanent residence of Raimondo’s family where he came back as soon completed his studies. In the same year, by proxy, since she lived in the Andes, he married the fourteen Carlotta Gaetani d’Aragona, who met only six years after the wedding. During his life, the prince of Sansevero took care of many things of a military nature, arts and culture, but also of inventions and alchemy. Adjacent to the family  mansion, separated by an alley, is still the chapel of his family, and according to legend, it was built by the ancestors of the prince in 1593 on an ancient temple of Isis, while in 1744, 100 years later, Raymond resumed the restoration works. Construction’s works that drained the family’s coffers and lasted until the death of the prince, but that made the small church with his Masonic influences and allegories, a masterpiece of Baroque Neapolitan, attended by famous artists.

Cristo velato

The chapel is known mainly for three idiosyncratic statues that adorn it, two of which “Veiled Modesty” and “Veiled Christ“, seem to be covered by a transparent veil of marble – that is all one with the sculpture –  and to date critics has not yet figured out the technique used. Same goes for the third statue entitled “Disillusion” on which there is a network created by marble. One of the hypotheses, by modern admirers of the Prince, is that it is the result of a process invented by the Prince to “marbleize” the fabric. This procedure, however, has not yet been put to the test, and still do not seem to be a convincing explanation. One possible interpretation of these works’ allegorical message, focuses on the Enlightenment, which is that through the reason man reaches the disappointment and gets rid of false truths. In the of the chapel’s “Underground Cave” we find two special “mummies” defined  “anatomical machines” by the prince, two human skeletons (a black woman and one man) with their entire circulatory system (including capillaries) perfectly visible.
It is not known how such structures have been obtained and legend has it that the Prince would obtain the “metallization” or “plastination” of the blood circuit “injecting” a compound of his invention and, therefore, the two subjects had to be alive at the time of the experiment (note that the syringe did not yet exist at the time). However, whether they are machines or real bodies is not certain, since the owners of the Chapel have always refused to let perform any type of investigation.

Disillusion

It was easy for the common people to give birth to magical stories on the erudite and mysterious Prince of Sansevero, who, however, did nothing to discredit the rumors rather, cloaked in the secrecy of his life, for days he remained closed in in his alchemical laboratory, where studied and realized his experiments and his inventions. It should be added that, in the basement of the palace, a printing press had been placed and its noise, very original for the time, could well fuel further rumors. From general accusations of alchemy, witchcraft and atheism, other more serious charges took root, without any basis as far as we know, such as kidnapping poor and homeless for his ignoble experiments. For this and more, he was nicknamed the “black noble”.
The Cappella Sansevero also known as the Capella Sansevero de’ Sangri received its alternative name of Pietatella (from the word pity) from a painting of the Virgin Mary (La Pietà), spotted there by an unjustly arrested prisoner, as reported in the book “Napoli Sacra” by Cesare d’Engenio Caracciolo in 1623. When the chapel was constructed it was originally dedicated to Santa Maria della Pietà, after the painting.
With its thirty works of art and decoration in late-Baroque, the chapel has always been a destination for tourists and visitors.

Metal Veins

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ITALIA’S GOT TALENT

Published March 18, 2013 by Tony

2013 ITALIA’S GOT TALENT

italia's got talent

Also this year the Italian version of “Talent show” is over. As you know, this TV show’s format is similar to “American Idol”, born years ago in England, and based on the discovery of new talent, in any discipline.
In this fourth edition of Italy’s Got Talent, started on January 12, last Saturday during the finals, the sixteen finalists have competed to let viewers choose the winner.
As in the past, the three judges have been Maria De Filippi, Gerry Scotti and Rudy Zerbi and the presenters Simon Annicchiarico and Belén Rodríguez (who participated despite being pregnant).
Among them were some who really deserved to win and I want to mention:


Walter Orfei Malachikhine, a sixteen year old boy belonging to the homonymous circus family, which struck the judges with his acrobatic numbers.

walter-orfei-malachikhine
Sara Venerucci and Danilo Decembrini, a pair of artistic skaters, three-time world champions.

Sara Venerucci and Danilo Decembrini
Daniele and Alessandro Suez, twelve and fifteen years, two brothers acrobAdomako Danielatic dancers who have conquered all with their skill.

daniele alessandro suez
Ripalta Bufo, a good 22-year old soprano from Puglia who has performed a difficult song from “La Traviata”.

Ripalta Bufo
Brothers Lo Tumulo (Daniele Sportelli and Elio Angelini), a comedy duo who made us laugh through a macabre comic sense, parodying and joking about death.

Lo Tumulo
The duo Los Hermanos Macana, consisting of two twin brothers (Enrique e Guillermo De Fazi) from Argentina, talented dancers of a “passionate” tango.

Los Hermanos Macana
Anyway, at televoting among the finalists Adomako Daniel has triumphed, a 21 year old native of Ghana, who has competed in a lyrical piece, a version of “At Last” by Etta James, giving a display of all the nuances of his particular voice.  He is assigned the expected prize of € 100,000. Daniel had already tried his luck at the X-Factor show, a few years ago, but was rejected.

DANIEL ADOMAKO
An important victory for the 21 year old guy from Brescia, who has always had to struggle, even with his father, to show his talent and desire to succeed. He impressed the audience by his celestial voice but by humility and kindness arising from a slight effeminacy.

Adomako Daniel

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Ron Mueck

Published March 11, 2013 by Tony

THE HYPERREALSISM IS SERVED!

"Mask II" Self-portrait
“Mask II” Self-portrait

Ron Mueck (born 1958), an Australian sculptor who works in England, is one of the most important contemporary artists of hyperrealism.
Its huge and incredible sculptures, between the grotesque and the unsettling, have been for a long time on show to the ex-Millennium Dome in London and at Charles Saatchi gallery.
His career started as models and puppets creator for film and television (he worked for the movie “Labyrinth”). His company is established then to London to deal with photorealistic and animated objects to the advertising industry. This activity led him to assert that “the photograph virtually destroys the physical presence of the original object,” and that’s why his interest then turned to sculpture.
In 1996 Mueck devoted himself to the “fine arts” in collaboration with the mother-in-law, Paula Rego, to produce small figures as part of a tableau on display at the Hayward Gallery. The work entitled “Pinocchio“, amazed so much Rego who introduced him to Charles Saatchi, who, immediately impressed, started to commission him some works. In 1997 Mueck created “Dead Dad”, which bears his name in the limelight as a participant in the exhibition “Sensation” at the Royal Academy.

pinocchio
Dead Dad” was nothing but the scaling of his father’s body after his death. This is the only Mueck’s work in which he used his own hair.
Mueck’s works reproduce faithfully every minute detail of the real human body, and playing with scale reproduction transmit disconcerting sensations.

Dead Dad
Boy 1999” five meters high, has characterized the Millennium Dome, then exposed to the Venice Biennale.

'Boy' - ARoS Aarhus Kunst Museum, Århus, Jutland, Denmark (new)

In 2002, the sculpture, “Pregnant Woman” was acquired by the National Gallery in Australia, for $ 800,000 Australians.

Pregnant_woman
Most of his sculpts show naked and dressed people, while some others, such as the woman “In Bed” of 2005, are covered by fabric.
To create his work, Ron Mueck uses resin, fiberglass and silicone. Hair are real (for the uninitiated, human hair can be purchased).

In Bed
In 2002 he held a solo exhibition (titled ‘Big Man’) at the Hirshhorn Museum and Sculpture Garden in Washington. Subsequently, other exhibitions at the Museum of Contemporary Art in Sydney and National Gallery in London.

'Big Man'

The works explore the contradictions between reality and artifice, creating a tension between reality and fantasy. Just a game between ambiguity, illusion and imitation. Veins, wrinkles, hair, complexion, skin, spots, no detail is overlooked in order to obtain a perfect resemblance to the “real life.”

A girl

Each work is the beginning of a story, a world introspective expressing an inner state.
Needless to say, his works, seen up close, produce a unique emotional and psychological impact!

Wild man two women

The artist at work

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Antonio Castelló Avilleira

Published March 11, 2013 by Tony

Extreme Hyperrealism
Paintings that look like Photos

Antonio Castelló Avilleira

Antonio Castelló Avilleira‘s works are noted for their incredible perfection of form and apparent simplicity of his motives.  His provocative and extremist hyperrealist style exhibits a unique technical perfection. In 2012 his works were exhibited at the European Museum of Modern Art in Barcelona and at Galería Espacio Abierto in Madrid, while recently at the Winter Show Plus One Gallery in London.

Hyperrealism is a genre of painting and sculpture resembling a high-resolution photograph and is considered an advancement of Photorealism by the methods used to create the resulting paintings or sculptures. The term is primarily applied to an independent art movement and art style in the United States and Europe that has developed since the early 2000s.
Hyperrealist painters and sculptors make allowances for some mechanical means of transferring images to the canvas or mold, including preliminary drawings or grisaille underpaintings and molds. Photographic slide projections or multimedia projectors are used to project images onto canvases and rudimentary techniques such as gridding may also be used to ensure accuracy.

Sin título - Óleo sobre tabla

Enzo - Acrílico y óleo sobre tabla

Sin título - Óleo sobre lienzo

Grapes  - Óleo sobre lienzo

 Sin título - Óleo sobre lienzo

Neumático - Óleo sobre lienzo

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LUCIO DALLA

Published March 3, 2013 by Tony

IN MEMORY OF LUCIO

Lucio Dalla

“Large sheets to cover ourselves I do not have…. and if life has no dreams I’ll take them and give to you”

Today is your birthday… best wishes to you, Lucio!

Lucio Dalla (Bologna, March 4, 1943 – Montreux, 1 March 2012) was a musician and a popular Italian singer-songwriter.
Nobody expected it and the morning of 1 March 2012, by a heart attack at age 69 in the Ritz Hotel in Montreux, where he had performed the night before, Lucio left us, with discretion but too soon!

Throughout his long career, which reached fifty years of activity, he has also performed as a keyboardist, saxophonist, and playing the clarinet, his passion from an early age.His extensive artistic production has gone through many phases, from the beat to the rhythmic and musical experimentation, from the songwriting till the boundaries of classical music and opera. Lucio Dalla was also an author known abroad with some of his songs translated and brought to success in several languages, in addition to many duet with artists, nationally and internationally.
Its success takes root in 1971, when for the third time he participated at the Festival of Sanremo with the song “4/3/1943” (his birthdate), a censored song initially called “Gesù Bambino” (Baby Jesus), and that talks about a girl mother, who has a son with an unknown ally soldier.
The success was consolidated the following year when still in Sanremo he sang the touching “Piazza Grande“, dedicated to a homeless man in Bologna, his beloved hometown where he lived. The city that in 1999 gave him an honorary degree in “Arts and Lucio DallaPhilosophy”.
During his career he has worked with numerous artists, Gino Paoli, Luigi Tenco, Roberto Roversi, Francesco De Gregori, the Stadio, Ron, Gianni Morandi, through whose collaboration many of his songs were born.
In March 1986 the tour with the group “Stadio”, for a series of concerts abroad, culminated with performances in the United States from which the double live album “Dallamericaruso.” arose. In this album is the song “Caruso”, that recounts the last days of the great tenor, and that will give to the singer from Emilia-Romagna, an extraordinary success. The song, which has sold nearly 9 million copies worldwide, is now considered a classic of Italian music. Over the years, the song has been interpreted by many artists of various nationalities, including Mercedes Sosa, Celine Dion, Michael Bolton, Lara Fabian, Julio Iglesias, Andrea Bocelli and Luciano Pavarotti. The song translated into several languages, to date, has sold over 38 million copies worldwide. The singer has repeatedly explained the genesis of this song: “a song of the heart,” born from an intense and unexpected trip in Sorrento. Because of a boat broken, he was forced to stop along the Sorrento coastline, in the same hotel and room where years before the great tenor Enrico Caruso had died.
Lucio’s mother was originally from Puglia, where the singer often went, and here his love for the South and especially for the sea was born, to the point to spend every summer at Tremiti Isles, as well as Lucio loved Naples, where often he docked his boat. In fact, in 1997 he was awarded the “Honorary Citizenship” from the town of Sorrento. Once he said: “I have been influenced by the existence of Totò (note, the Neapolitan artist Antonio De Curtis Gagliardi), in all its forms, for me he was a myth. The beauty of Totò is the beauty of Naples. Naples, not easy to say, seems a city, but is not, it is a nation, a republic….. the admiration I have for Naples’s people was born out by this love for Totò…. Naples is the mystery of life, good and evil are mixed, but pulsate however“. About his love for the South, in an interview he said: “It was during these vacations as an emigrant backwards, which took place in me the split between two different ways of living. So today I have two souls: the northern one (orderly, efficient, futuristic, perfectionist, demanding to themselves and to others) and southern (disorganized, wild, sensual, dreamy, mystical), it is in the south that I became religious, of a religion frantic, irrational“.
Marco AlemannoFrom February 2007 began a collaboration with Marco Tutino, artistic director of the Teatro Comunale of Bologna, for the preparation of some opera and theater works, and it is here that the long-lasting friendship with Marco Alemanno, becomes more apparent. The Lucio Dalla “different” sexual orientation was known to his few close friends and not to the public, at least not officially. Although because of his success he had the “prigs” (fucking moralists) in the palm of his hand, Lucio remained silent, refusing to declare his homosexuality, fearful of the moralists’ judgment, as if, on the contrary, they were to have him on a string. That is why he had to “disguise” his feelings in the songs, sometimes inventing female names and faces of fantasy. He gave and inspired emotions, hiding his own ones.
Marco Alemanno, born in 1980, left his small town to pursue his passion for art in the city of the great Lucio Dalla, where their paths crossed to then separate tragically on March 1st of 2012. Marco followed him in every show and in every battle. In 2007, Marco appears on Lucio Dalla album “Il Contrario di me” (The opposite of me), as producer and co-author of some texts. The following year, he publishes “Gli occhi di Lucio” (Lucio’s eyes), a book with a DVD-written with Lucio and containing Dalla photographs and unpublished writings. Marco appears again in 2009 as artistic producer and co-author of some songs in the album “Angoli nel cielo” (Angles in the sky), and the year after participated in Dalla & De Gregori tour “Work in progress”, as singer and narrator.
Marco Alemanno has gained a lot of notoriety for the moving words with which he reminded Lucio on the occasion of his funeral in Bologna. His talk brought some controversy about the fact that the singer had never formalized his relationship with him, while the Catholic Church has condemned his intervention during the funerals in church. In his funeral speech, Mark has played some verses of the song by Lucio “Le Rondini” (The Swallows): “I would like to understand, in short, what love is, where is that you take and give it”.  Then, before bursting into tears, adding: “For some time now I had the pleasure, honor and privilege to grow alongside Lucio, singer, musician, filmmaker, and above all the man, eternal child, to whom I owe so much.

Since the singer did not leave a will, his inheritance, estimated at approximately 100 million euros, will be divided between his five first cousins. In the absence of a specific bequest, Marco Alemanno, intimate partner and resident in the same house for several years, has no legal rights.

I want to highlight that, although the ‘coming out‘ is a something useful and liberating for themselves and for those who are less strong, we cannot expect it to be a mandatory practice. People are different, have different thoughts and stories, and there are no rules with regard to their privacy. It would be nice and fair that we all take for granted that love, joy & sorrow’s sharing, and humanity were fixed rules regardless of our beliefs. And then “everyone will love how it goes,” as our dear friend Lucio sang and hoped.

Although the discography of this great songwriter includes twenty-two studio album for the Italian market, a Q Disc, nine live albums, several books and albums for the foreign market, among the many beautiful songs that Lucio has left us, and in addition to those already mentioned, I want to mention: L’Anno che verrà, Attenti Al Lupo, Anna E Marco, Tu Non Mi Basti Mai, Come E’ Profondo il Mare, Caro Amico Ti Scrivo, Stella Di Mare, Disperato Erotico Stomp, L’Ultima Luna, Telefonami Tra Vent’anni, Un Uomo Come Me, Cara, Nuvolari, Il Gigante e La Bambina, Balla Balla Ballerino, Futura.  (The Year to come, The Wolf, Anna and Mark, I Just Do not You Never Come and ‘Deep Sea, Dear Friend I am writing, Star of the Sea, Erotic Stomp, The Last Moon, Call me Between Twenty years, A Man Like Me, Honey, Nuvolari, The Giant and The Child, Dance dance Dancer, Futura).

Here’s the literal translation of his words showed in the picture below the title.

“Of many houses, not any one that has no windows, any shred of sky over the roofs of the city, where I lived and where I listened, checked, tried the beating of your heart, your breaths, your curses, the noise of your dreams, the mysterious small daily killings and the miraculous births that every day God sends us and which take place under the skies of all countries and of all the cities on overcast nights of stars. It is from there that have fallen words, stones, stories and sounds that arrive to me by the beautiful deception of love that never ends, or the sensuality of the best encounters, those dreamed, those where there are no more break ups, where you don’t die or die is just disappearing under a sweet, lovely snowfall. It is from that glimpse of heaven and heart that I will listen to you even when no one will listen to me, that I’ll still be looking for you although you will not be looking for me anymore. And from up there, until there will be a window, my heart will sing the life and story that takes it.”

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Dear Lucio, although I respect your discretion and silence, I would have liked if you had had the courage to shout to the world your “diversity“, because coming from a great man like you, this would tell someone else that there is no “diversity” as these others still think.


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